Who We Are

Owl Financial is a UK-wide advice business that's focused on helping people secure the right level of protection cover. We pride ourselves on delivering a professional, face-to-face service.
 
At Owl Financial, we firmly believe in the value of personalised advice. Owl Advisers are trained to a high standard and the quality of the advice we provide is constantly assessed. We work within strict guidelines to ensure that the advice we give and the products we recommend are appropriate for your needs. 

We are licensed to recommend a superb combination of protection products from Aviva, Legal & General, MetLife UK and Zurich, as well as General Insurance via Paymentshield. If you require commercial insurance, private medical insurance or a Will, we can introduce you to our specialist partners. If you're looking to buy a new home, or move up the property ladder, our mortgage team can advise on mortgages and remortgages.


 
Owl Financial is a trading style of Openwork Limited, which is one of the UK's largest networks of financial advisers.

The information on this website is subject to the UK regulatory regime and is therefore targeted at consumers in the UK.

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Personal Finance

Britain's markets and pensions regulators on Thursday launched a joint strategy aimed at improving pensions outcomes for savers, amid concern that many people are entering retirement without enough income.
British inflation fell more than expected in September to a three-month low, offering some relief to consumers who have been squeezed financially since the Brexit vote.
British pay growth is struggling to exceed 3 percent and policymakers should not over-react to a recent improvement, Bank of England Deputy Governor Jon Cunliffe said on Wednesday, striking a more cautious tone than some of fellow policymakers.
The basic wages of workers in Britain rose at their fastest pace in nearly a decade over the summer months, backing up the Bank of England's view that a long period of weak pay increases is ending.
British taxes would need to rise to their highest since just after World War Two to sustainably meet Prime Minister Theresa May's goal of ending the austerity squeeze on public services, a think tank said ahead of her government's annual budget.